What Good Is the UFCW?

Two UFCW members were fired for buying items while on the clock at a Michigan grocery store. Unfortunately for the two workers, the UFCW abandoned them and refused to take their cases to arbitration. The two women, who were longtime employees of the company, then filed suit against the union. Rather than use its members’ dues money to fight for its members, the UFCW chose to use their money to fight the women in court. If the UFCW can’t be bothered to try to help its members when they are fired over a relatively minor issue, what is the point of paying union dues?

Two UFCW members were fired for buying items while on the clock at a Michigan grocery store. Unfortunately for the two workers, the UFCW abandoned them and refused to take their cases to arbitration. The two women, who were longtime employees of the company, then filed suit against the union. Rather than use its members’ […]






Losing Faith in the UFCW

A Colorado man, who tried to unionize his employer, has lost faith in the UFCW. Last year, Matt Hobson was employed at a marijuana shop and was dissatisfied with the working conditions so he contacted the UFCW. His employer subsequently fired him, and the UFCW lost the certification election. Among others, he blames union organizers for the election loss.

“I went into the entire matter thinking that the union was the last bastion of worker protection and that we would have the security and muscle of the union behind us,” he recalls. But thinking that, he says now, was a big mistake…

Hobson says the UFCW Local 7 organizers who had helped him begin organizing largely lost interest after he was fired, doing very little to assist him in finding a new job. Instead, they appeared keen on having him try to return to his old position, despite the fact that he no longer felt comfortable there. “They wanted me to go back to that horrible environment to try to hand them a victory,” he says…

“‘Maybes’ and ‘no promises’ … are the only things that the union seems to offer in abundance.”

… “At this point,” he says, “I trust the UFCW about as much as the cannabis industry.”

Since he was fired, he’s hardly worked.

A Colorado man, who tried to unionize his employer, has lost faith in the UFCW. Last year, Matt Hobson was employed at a marijuana shop and was dissatisfied with the working conditions so he contacted the UFCW. His employer subsequently fired him, and the UFCW lost the certification election. Among others, he blames union organizers […]






“Poor Representation”

 Due to “poor representation,” the UFCW badly lost a decertification vote in California

Workers at Hiji Bros., Inc. and Seaview Growers Inc., both based in Oxnard, cast ballots to decertify and replace the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 5 with the UFW.

The vote came down to 111 for the UFW, 61 for UFCW Local 5 and 6 for no-union.

A petition to decertify the UFCW was filed with the farm labor board last week and signed by about 80 percent of the workers who complained about poor representation.

 Due to “poor representation,” the UFCW badly lost a decertification vote in California Workers at Hiji Bros., Inc. and Seaview Growers Inc., both based in Oxnard, cast ballots to decertify and replace the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 5 with the UFW. The vote came down to 111 for the UFW, 61 for UFCW […]






Meddling in Politics

politico3The UFCW just gave $25,000 to a Democrat challenger of Gov. Mike Pence.

The UFCW just gave $25,000 to a Democrat challenger of Gov. Mike Pence.






Contributing to Bankruptcy

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By working to keep labor costs high, unions have contributed to A&P’s second bankruptcy. (The UFCW represents a large majority of A&P’s workers.)

Among the issues it cited for its bankruptcy filing—industry competition, paying leases on “dark stores,” and problems associated with supplier and service contracts (with unionized companies)—was the cost of its own unionized workforce. As 95% of its workforce is covered by contracts with the United Food & Commercial Workers, as it explains in its filing with the Court, A&P’s liabilities were only going to increase:

In addition to their specific obligations under the GHI  contract, the Debtors are parties to approximately 39 separate collective bargaining agreements (covering approximately 95 percent of the Debtors’ workforce).

Among other things, these agreements require the Debtors to make significant pension, and health care-related contributions on their employees’ behalf.  The Debtors believe these legacy obligations will continue to increase over time. Certain of the Debtors’ multi-employer pension plans have already reached “red” or “yellow” status under existing regulatory requirements, and the Debtors have recorded for a liability $97 million from previous pension fund withdrawals, as of September 11, 2010. The Debtors may have a potential additional withdrawal obligation of up to $50 million payable over a period of up to 25 years in the future. The Debtors believe their collectively-bargained wage, pension, and health care obligations place them at a competitive disadvantage and are unsustainable at existing levels.

‘Bumping’ was also a problem for the company.

Additionally, many of the debtor’s CBAs include “bumping” provisions that require the company to lay off employees by seniority. This clause has an interstore element, which means that if a store is closed, those senior employees can take the job of a more junior worker at another location.

“As a result, the closing of one store results in increased salaries–the same high salaries that may have in part precipitated the store closing–being transferred to another (possibly profitable) store,” the CRO [chief restructuring officer] said.

By admin On Aug 7, 2015 Latest updates Comments Off By working to keep labor costs high, unions have contributed to A&P’s second bankruptcy. (The UFCW represents a large majority of A&P’s workers.) Among the issues it cited for its bankruptcy filing—industry competition, paying leases on “dark stores,” and problems associated with supplier and service contracts […]






Unreasonable Expectations

supermarket newsUFCW is pushing legislation to require businesses to put work schedules together two weeks early in businesses whose sales are predictably unpredictable.

The Western States Council of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union said Wednesday it has launched television and radio ads in support of the California Fair Scheduling Act, which would provide more predictable schedules for retail workers.

The proposed legislation, introduced in the California Assembly, would require employers to provide two weeks’ notice on schedules and would pay workers for any last-minute changes.

UFCW is pushing legislation to require businesses to put work schedules together two weeks early in businesses whose sales are predictably unpredictable. The Western States Council of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union said Wednesday it has launched television and radio ads in support of the California Fair Scheduling Act, which would provide more predictable […]






Coloradans Say, ‘No, Thanks’

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Coloradans in the marijuana industry chose not to buy what the UFCW was selling.

When merchants in Denver opened their doors on New Year’s Day 2014 to mark the first legal recreational marijuana sales in American history, not a single union worker could be found. Organizers blame Colorado’s independent streak and less labor-friendly laws for being left out of the country’s biggest recreational cannabis economy.

By admin On Jul 30, 2015 Latest updates Comments Off Coloradans in the marijuana industry chose not to buy what the UFCW was selling. When merchants in Denver opened their doors on New Year’s Day 2014 to mark the first legal recreational marijuana sales in American history, not a single union worker could be found. […]